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WFC Arena Kyiv

Founded in 1988 and competed in several Soviet competitions including the Soviet Top League in 1990 and 1991. The club placed only sixth in its group and managed to beat the Russian Prometei Leningrad for the 11th place play-off. Next season the ...

                                               

Banh bao banh vac

Banh bao ban vac are a regional specialty of Vietnamese cuisine peculiar to Hoi An. The rice paper is translucent and wrapped to resemble a flower shape. Said to be made with water from a certain well in Hoi An, this dumpling is not found anywher ...

                                               

Liege College, Leuven

Liege College, founded 1605, was a college for the better students of theology from the Diocesan Seminary of Liege to study at the University of Leuven. The land for the foundation was purchased in 1602 at the request of Ernest of Bavaria, prince ...

                                               

Johanna Masdani

Johanna Tumbuan Masdani, also known as Jo Masdani, was a pioneering figure in Indonesian independence. She was born Johanna Tumbuan in Amurang, in the region of Minahasa in North Sulawesi. She was present during two important events in Indonesian ...

                                               

Cafe Majestic

Cafe Majestic is an historical cafe, located at Rua de Santa Catarina, in Porto, Portugal. The building is from the Art Nouveau period, reminiscent of Parisian cafes at the time.

                                               

Maine Black Bears football, 1900–1909

The 1900 Maine Black Bears football team was an American football team that represented the University of Maine during the 1900 college football season. In its first and only season under head coach Ernest Burton, the team compiled a 4–4 record. ...

                                               

Matt Chorley

Chorley was brought up near Taunton on the Somerset Levels and attended Richard Huish College and initially began work at the now defunct Taunton Times.

                                               

Valentine Blomfield

Blomfield was commissioned into the Border Regiment on 7 April 1916. He saw action during the Western Front during the First World War and was the deployed to India during Waziristan campaign. He was deployed to France with the British Expedition ...

                                               

1950 Maine Black Bears football team

The 1950 Maine Black Bears football team was an American football team that represented the University of Maine as a member of the Yankee Conference during the 1950 college football season. In its second and final season under head coach David M. ...

                                               

Arkansas v. Tennessee

Arkansas v. Tennessee, 397 U.S. 88 was a case decided by the United States Supreme Court to settle a dispute between the states of Arkansas and Tennessee as to where a portion of the boundary line between the states should run.

                                               

Dayton Flyers football, 1910–1919

The St. Marys football program from 1910 to 1919 represented St. Marys College in its second decade of intercollegiate football. The team during those years was led by four head coaches: Orville Smith was the head coach in 1910 and compiled a 5–1 ...

                                               

Johannes Weyrauch

The retirement age opened up completely new travel opportunities for GDR citizens. Contacts to West German publishing houses were established and friends all over Germany were visited. In 1967 Weyrauch finally ended his teaching activities at the ...

                                               

Cees Datema

Cees "Cornelis" Datema was a Dutch academic with special focus on Latin and Greek and the preaching of the early church fathers. He obtained his PhD from Vrije Universiteit of Amsterdam in 1970 and his original thesis on Asterius of Amasea is sti ...

                                               

Jan Schlebusch

Schlebusch finished his schooling in Kroonstad, studied at the University of the Free State and became a teacher at Grey College, in Bloemfontein. He played provincial rugby for the Free State and played in the Currie Cup finals of 1973, 1975, 19 ...

                                               

Jean-François Gilart de Larchantel

Jean-François Gilart de Larchantel was a French Navy officer. He notably served during the War of American Independence.

                                               

Cape Cod (disambiguation)

Cape Cod is a peninsula in southeastern Massachusetts. Cape Cod may also refer to: Cape Codder cocktail, an alcoholic beverage Cape Cod National Seashore, a federally protected seashore in Massachusetts Cape Cod style, an 1800s lighthouse design ...

                                               

Matthew Smyth (principal)

Matthew Smyth or Smith was born in Lancaster. One of his contemporary relations, Gilbert Smith, held the Archdeaconry of Peterborough. Matthew Smith began his Bachelor of Arts degree at Oxford Oriel College in 1501; he was a Fellow of Oriel from ...

                                               

A way of flying

A way of flying is a print by the Spanish painter and printmaker Francisco Goya. Created between 1815 and 1816, it is the 13th of the 22 aquatints making up the series Los disparates. Along with the rest of the series it was first published in 18 ...

                                               

Jeremy Savile

Savile was named by John Playford as among the leading London teachers "for the voyce or viol" during the period. Playford and Savile were members of a catch club in Old Jewry. Lynan in the Oxford Dictionary of National Biography notes that Playf ...

                                               

Jesse Torrey

Jesse Torrey, Jr., was a Philadelphia physician who gathered first-hand narratives by African Americans and eye-witness accounts by white observers of slavery and kidnapping. He published these, along with his personal observations, in an early a ...

                                               

Henry R. Dunham

Dunham was born in New York during either the late 18th or early 19th century. Dunhams early life is unknown, as he first appears in the historical record in 1834. In 1837 Dunham opened a machine shop on North Moore Street in New York City. He la ...

                                               

Richard Gypson

His first recorded flight was on 14 May, 1832 from London. He worked for Vauxhall Gardens. In April 1839 he made an ascent from the Standard Tavern, City Road in one of Mr H Greens hydrogen filled balloons. By September 1840 he was achieving his ...

                                               

William Dressler (musician)

Dressler was born in Nottingham, England in 1826. His father was a court flutist for the King of Saxony. In 1847, Dressler graduated from the Cologne Conservatory of Music. After that, Dressler was the first violinist and later conductor of the O ...

                                               

George H. Bush

Bush was born in Greenfield Park, New York on February 18, 1857. He was of Irish and German parentage. Bush studied law in Cornell University and passed the state bar shortly after graduating. He served as Town Clerk of Wawarsing and Police Justi ...

                                               

Its a Most Unusual Day

"Its a Most Unusual Day is a popular song composed by Jimmy McHugh, with lyrics by Harold Adamson. It is considered part of the Great American Songbook. It was introduced in the film A Date with Judy when it was sung by Jane Powell in the opening ...

                                               

Enid Harvesters

The Enid Harvesters was a primary name of the minor league baseball teams based in Enid, Oklahoma. Enid minor league teams played as members of the Southwestern League, Western Association, Oklahoma State League, Southwestern League and Western A ...

                                               

Hedwig Andersen

Hedwig Andersen was with Clara Schlaffhorst founder of the Methode nach Schlaffhorst und Andersen, a method of respiration, speech and voice therapy.

                                               

Symeon Savvidis

Symeon Savvidis, or Sabbides was a Greek painter; influenced by the Munich School. His most familiar works are on Turkish themes.

                                               

Limehouse (disambiguation)

Limehouse is a district in London. Limehouse may also refer to: Limehouse, Ontario Limehouse Link tunnel Limehouse Basin Limehouse station Limehouse Declaration, the announcement of the formation of the Social Democractic Party SDP in the United ...

                                               

Central Camera

Central Camera is a camera shop at 230 South Wabash in Chicago, Illinois. It is the oldest camera store in the city. It opened in 1899 at 31 Adams Street. It was started by a Hungarian immigrant and is currently operated by a third-generation own ...

                                               

Myrtle Smith Livingston

Myrtle Athleen Smith was born in Holly Grove, Arkansas, in 1902, the daughter of Isaac Samuel Smith and Lulu C. Hall Smith. She graduated from high school in 1920. She studied pharmacy at Howard University for two years 1920-1922, and earned a Co ...

                                               

United Union of German Railway Workers

The United Union of German Railway Workers was a trade union representing railway workers in Germany. The union was founded on 27 June 1925, when the German Railway Union merged with the National Union of German Railway Officials and Trainees. On ...

                                               

Friedrich Hermann Schubert

Born in Dresden, Schubert was born in 1925 as the son of the Dresden professor of architecture and architect Otto Schubert and the teacher Veronika nee Struver, whose parents were well established in the high society of Dresden; this was especial ...

                                               

Nude, 1925

Nude, 1925 is a photograph taken by Edward Weston in 1925. It helds the record for the most expensive photograph of Weston after being sold by Nude, 1925 is a photograph taken by Edward Weston in 1925. It helds the record for the most expensive p ...

                                               

1955 Penn Quakers football team

The 1955 Penn Quakers football team was an American football team that represented the University of Pennsylvania during the 1955 college football season. Led by Steve Sebo in his second as head coach, the Quakers finished the season with a 0–9 r ...

                                               

Rollie McKenna

Rosalie Thorne Rollie McKenna was an American photographer. Writers photographed by McKenna include Sylvia Plath, Robert Frost, Dylan Thomas, and Truman Capote. McKenna had a long term friendship with Malcolm Brinnin, who helped her come in conta ...

                                               

Work song (disambiguation)

A work song is a song about human labor. Work song may also be: "Work Song Nat Adderley song", the title track from that album. Not to be confused with "Work Song" by Charles Mingus on Mingus at the Bohemia. "Work Song Bill Laswell song", a song ...

                                               

Control center

Control room, a central space where a large physical facility or physically dispersed service can be monitored and controlled NORAD Control Center, a Cold War-era joint command center for USAF and Army Air Defense Commands Area Control Center, a ...

                                               

David Housman

David E. Housman is an American geneticist. He is the Virginia and D.K. Ludwig Professor for Cancer Research in the Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research at Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He is known for his contribution to the d ...

                                               

ACCC

Atlantic Cape Community College, an accredited, co-educational, two-year, public, community college Association of Canadian Community Colleges, a national association formed in 1972

                                               

Stormbringer (disambiguation)

Stormbringer may refer to: Stormbringer, magical black sword featured in fantasy stories by Michael Moorcock Stormbringer novel, 1965 novel by Michael Moorcock, a fix-up of four novellas about Elric of Melnibone Stormbringer role-playing game by ...

                                               

Gerty Simon

Gertrud Simon, known professionally as Gerty Simon, was born Gertrud Cohnin Bremen in 1887 to a well-to-do Jewish family with her father being a lawyer. She was a photographer in between-the-wars Berlin, and later in London. She died in 1970.

                                               

Caroline Bradley

Caroline Frances Bradley MBE was an international British show-jumper, becoming the first female winner of the Puissance at the Horse of the year show in 1974, an era when the sport was still largely dominated by male riders. She went on to win t ...

                                               

Buddy Esquire

Esquire was born in the Bronx, New York, and lived in the James Monroe Houses. In 1972, he began creating graffiti, tagging under the names, "ESQ" and "Phantom 1." Graffiti was an early practice in artistic development. He said, "I kept practicin ...

                                               

Save Your Tears

Save Your Tears is a record by Canadian singer The Weeknd from his fourth studio album After Hours The Weeknd wrote and produced the song with producers Max Martin and Oscar Holter, with Belly and Jason Quenneville receiving additional writing cr ...

                                               

EP2

EP2, EP-2 or EP 2 may refer to: EP2 procyclin, a trypanosome procyclin protein Olympus PEN E-P2, a camera EP 2 Qveen Herby EP EP2, a chemical process used to develop color photographs in the 1980s and 1990s EP2 FKA Twigs EP, 2013 PKP class EP02, ...

                                               

Melita Rodeck

Melita Rodeck was an American architect. She studied architecture at the Polytechnic Institute of Vienna, Austria in 1932 and immigrated to the United States in 1939 following the spread of World War II. Rodeck became a registered architect of th ...

                                               

Captiva

Captiva may refer to: Captiva album, an album by Christian rock band Falling Up Holden Captiva, the Australian version of the Chevrolet Captiva Captiva, an instant camera released by Polaroid during the mid-1990s Captiva Records, an American reco ...

                                               

Shafiqul Islam (academic)

Shafiqul Islam is a Bangladeshi American researcher, academic and author. He is Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering and Professor of Water Diplomacy at Tufts University. He serves as the Director of Water Diplomacy. He is also the Fo ...

                                               

Indian locomotive class WDS-5

The class WDS-5 is a diesel-electric locomotive used by Indian Railways for shunting and doing departmental works. The model name stands for broad gauge, D iesel, S hunting engine. The WDS-6 is used all over India.