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Superior (hierarchy)

In a hierarchy or tree structure of any kind, a superior is an individual or position at a higher level in the hierarchy than another, and thus closer to the apex. In business, superiors are people who are supervisors and in the military, superio ...

                                               

Superiority complex

Superiority complex is an informal term related to the DSM-IV-TR diagnosis grandiose delusions. Superiority complex is either developed from a defensive need to overcome inferiority or constant overwhelming feelings in which an individual feels t ...

                                               

Supremacism

Supremacism is an ideology which holds that a certain class of people is superior to others, and that they should dominate, control, subjugate, and/or eliminate others, or are entitled to do so. The supposed superior people can be an age, race sp ...

                                               

True self and false self

True self and false self are psychological concepts, originally introduced into psychoanalysis in 1960 by Donald Winnicott. Winnicott used true self to describe a sense of self based on spontaneous authentic experience and a feeling of being aliv ...

                                               

Unhealthy narcissism

                                               

Vanity

Vanity is the excessive belief in ones own abilities or attractiveness to others. Prior to the 14th century it did not have such narcissistic undertones, and merely meant futility. The related term vainglory is now often seen as an archaic synony ...

                                               

WAGs

WAGs is an acronym used to refer to wives and girlfriends of high-profile sportspersons. The term may also be used in the singular form, WAG, to refer to a specific female partner or life partner who is in a relationship with a sportsperson. The ...

                                               

Biological opportunism

                                               

Economic opportunism

Economic opportunism is a term related to the subversion of morality to profit. There exists no agreed general, scientific definition or theory of economic opportunism; the literature usually considers only specific cases and contexts.

                                               

Evolutionary opportunism

                                               

Freewheeling opportunism

Freewheeling opportunism is a concept that suggests a company does not need formal business planning instead it should remain open to opportunities as they arise and led by market conditions and events therefore adapting to changes required in or ...

                                               

Intellectual opportunism

Intellectual opportunism is the pursuit of intellectual opportunities with a selfish, ulterior motive not consistent with relevant principles. The term refers to certain self-serving tendencies of the human intellect, often involving professional ...

                                               

Legal opportunism

Legal opportunism is a wide area of human activity, which refers generally to a type of abuse of the proper intention of legal arrangements. More specifically, it refers to deliberately manipulating legal arrangements for purposes they were not m ...

                                               

Political opportunism

Political opportunism refers to the attempt to maintain political support, or to increase political influence - possibly in a way which disregards relevant ethical or political principles.

                                               

Professional opportunism

                                               

Sexual opportunism

Sexual opportunism is the selfish pursuit of sexual opportunities for their own sake when they arise, often with the negative moral connotation that in some way it "takes advantage" of others, or "makes use" of, or "exploits", other persons for s ...

                                               

Social opportunism

                                               

Spiritual opportunism

Spiritual opportunism refers to the exploitation of spiritual ideas: for personal gain, partisan interests or selfish motives. Usually the implication is that doing so is unprincipled in some way, although it may cause no harm and involve no abus ...

                                               

Organizational behavior

Organizational behavior or organisational behaviour is the: "study of human behavior in organizational settings, the interface between human behavior and the organization, and the organization itself". OB research can be categorized in at least t ...

                                               

Achievement Motivation Inventory

Achievement Motivation inventory is a psychological test to assess a broad construct of job-related achievement motivation. It is used within personnel selection, promotion, I/O-psychological research, personality research and other applications ...

                                               

Administrative Behavior

Administrative Behavior: a Study of Decision-Making Processes in Administrative Organization is a book written by Herbert A. Simon. It asserts that "decision-making is the heart of administration, and that the vocabulary of administrative theory ...

                                               

Agile leadership

Agile leadership is the craft of creating the right context for self-organisation. An environment where agile teams collaborate, learn from each other, get quick feedback from users and are focused on quality and continuous learning. He or she do ...

                                               

Appreciative inquiry

Appreciative inquiry is a model that seeks to engage stakeholders in self-determined change. According to Bushe "AI revolutionized the field of organization development and was a precursor to the rise of positive organization studies and the stre ...

                                               

Behavior-based safety

Behavior-based safety is the "application of science of behavior change to real world safety problems". or "A process that creates a safety partnership between management and employees that continually focuses peoples attentions and actions on th ...

                                               

Behavioral systems analysis

Behavioral systems analysis, or performance systems analysis, applies behavior analysis and systems analysis to human performance in organizations. BSA is directly related to performance management and organizational behavior management.

                                               

Boardroom coup

A boardroom coup is a sudden and often unexpected takeover or transfer of power of an organisation or company. The coup is usually performed by an individual or a small group usually from within the corporation in order to seize power. A Boardroo ...

                                               

Buying center

A buying center, also called decision-making unit, brings together "all those members of an organization who become involved in the buying process for a particular product or service". The concept of a DMU was developed in 1967 by Robinson, Farri ...

                                               

Civic virtue (organizational citizenship behavior dimension)

Civic virtue is one of the five dimensions of organizational citizenship behavior identified in Dennis Organs prominent 1988 definition of the construct. Originally, Smith, Organ, and Near first proposed two dimensions: altruism and general compl ...

                                               

Collaboration

Collaboration is the process of two or more people or organizations working together to complete a task or achieve a goal. Collaboration is similar to cooperation. Most collaboration requires leadership, although the form of leadership can be soc ...

                                               

Collaborative partnership

Collaborative partnerships are agreements and actions made by consenting organizations to share resources to accomplish a mutual goal. Collaborative partnerships rely on participation by at least two parties who agree to share resources, such as ...

                                               

Conformity

Conformity is the act of matching attitudes, beliefs, and behaviors to group norms, politics or being like minded. Norms are implicit, specific rules, shared by a group of individuals, that guide their interactions with others. People often choos ...

                                               

Counterproductive norms

Counterproductive norms are group norms that prevent a group, organization, or other collective entities from performing or accomplishing its originally stated function by working oppositely to how they were initially intended. Group norms are ty ...

                                               

Digital Taylorism

Digital Taylorism, also known as New Taylorism, is a modern take on the management style known as classic Taylorism or scientific management. Digital Taylorism is based on maximizing efficiency by standardizing and routinizing the tools and techn ...

                                               

Employee engagement

Employee engagement is a fundamental concept in the effort to understand and describe, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the nature of the relationship between an organization and its employees. An "engaged employee" is defined as one who is ...

                                               

Fiedler contingency model

The contingency model by business and management psychologist Fred Fiedler is a contingency theory concerned with the effectiveness of a leader in an organization.

                                               

High performance organization

The high performance organization is a conceptual framework for organizations that leads to improved, sustainable organizational performance. It is an alternative model to the bureaucratic model known as Taylorism. There is not a clear definition ...

                                               

History of contingency theories of leadership

The history of contingency theories of leadership goes back over more than 100 years, with foundational ideas rooted in the mechanical thought of Taylorism. Later, management science began to recognize the influence of sometimes irrational human ...

                                               

Imprinting (organizational theory)

In organizational theory and organizational behavior, imprinting is a core concept describing how the past affects the present. Imprinting is generally defined as a process whereby, during a brief period of susceptibility, a focal entity or actor ...

                                               

Industry self-regulation

Industry self-regulation is the process whereby members of an industry, trade or sector of the economy monitor their own adherence to legal, ethical, or safety standards, rather than have an outside, independent agency such as a third party entit ...

                                               

Informal organization

The informal organization is the interlocking social structure that governs how people work together in practice. It is the aggregate of norms, personal and professional connections through which work gets done and relationships are built among p ...

                                               

Interactional justice

Interactional justice is defined by sociologist John R. Schermerhorn as the ".degree to which the people affected by decision are treated by dignity and respect". The theory focuses on the interpersonal treatment people receive when procedures ar ...

                                               

Job characteristic theory

Job characteristics theory is a theory of work design. It provides" a set of implementing principles for enriching jobs in organizational settings”. The original version of job characteristics theory proposed a model of five" core” job characteri ...

                                               

Job satisfaction

Job satisfaction or employee satisfaction is a measure of workers contentedness with their job, whether or not they like the job or individual aspects or facets of jobs, such as nature of work or supervision. Job satisfaction can be measured in c ...

                                               

Law of triviality

Parkinsons law of triviality is C. Northcote Parkinsons 1957 argument that members of an organization give disproportionate weight to trivial issues. Parkinson provides the example of a fictional committee whose job was to approve the plans for a ...

                                               

Managerial grid model

The managerial grid model is a style leadership model developed by Robert R. Blake and Jane Mouton. This model originally identified five different leadership styles based on the concern for people and the concern for production. The optimal lead ...

                                               

Marking your own homework

Mark your own homework is a British expression used in political discourse, the study of organisational behaviour and in everyday life. The expression implies that whenever a person or group self-assesses and/or self regulates their own work they ...

                                               

Micro-initiative

Micro-initiatives are individual and collective actors who by means of interventions in public space contribute to the development of their cities from the bottom-up. Micro-initiatives are difficult to judge by their efficiency and turnover, but ...

                                               

Nut Island effect

The Nut Island effect describes an organizational behavior phenomenon in which a team of skilled employees becomes isolated from distracted top managers resulting in a catastrophic loss of the ability of the team to perform an important mission. ...

                                               

Organisation climate

Organizational climate is a concept that has academic meaning in the fields of Organizational Behavior and I/O Psychology as well as practical meaning in the business world There is continued scholarly debate about the exact definition of organiz ...

                                               

Organisational routines

In organizational theory, organizational routines are" repetitive, recognizable patterns of interdependent actions, carried out by multiple actors”. Routines have been used in evolutionary economics and in generalized evolutionary theory as a soc ...

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