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L. Bancel LaFarge

Louis Bancel LaFarge was born into a prominent American family. His grandfather, John LaFarge, was a noted American artist. His grandmother was a granddaughter of Commodore Oliver Hazard Perry and a direct descendant of Benjamin Franklin. His fat ...

                                               

Sherman Lee

Sherman Emery Lee was an American academic, writer, art historian and expert on Asian art. He was Director of the Cleveland Museum of Art from 1958 to 1983. Lee earned his B.A. and M.A. at American University in Washington, D.C. He was awarded hi ...

                                               

Leon Levy

Born to a Jewish family, Levy attended Townsend Harris High School and studied psychology at City College of New York. After serving in the U.S. Army, he began working as a research analyst. He was strongly influenced in his business approach by ...

                                               

Malagana

Malagana, also known as the Malagana Treasure is an archaeological site of Colombia named after the same name sugarcane estate where it was accidentally discovered in 1992. During a few days after its discovery, the place was subject to a large s ...

                                               

The Man Who Lost His Head

The Man Who Lost His Head is a 2-hour comedy drama written by Mark Wallington and starring Martin Clunes about the theme of cultural repatriation. It was a joint production of TVNZ in New Zealand and ITV in the United Kingdom.

                                               

Ethelwyn Manning

Ethelwyn Manning was the second Chief Librarian of the Frick Art Reference Library. During World War II, she assisted the Committee of the American Council of Learned Societies on Protection of Cultural Treasures in War Areas, later known as the ...

                                               

Marbles Reunited

Marbles Reunited: Friends of the British Committee for the Reunification of the Parthenon Marbles is a campaign group, governed by charter and funded by donations from members and supporters, which lobbies and raises awareness about the case for ...

                                               

Maud (ship)

Maud, named for Queen Maud of Norway, was a ship built for Roald Amundsen for his second expedition to the Arctic. Designed for his intended voyage through the Northeast Passage, the vessel was built in Asker, a suburb of the capital, Oslo. Maud ...

                                               

Monteleone chariot

The Monteleone chariot is an Etruscan chariot dated to c. 530 BC, considered one of the worlds great archaeological finds. It was originally uncovered at Monteleone di Spoleto and is currently a star attraction in the collection of the Metropolit ...

                                               

Monuments Men Foundation for the Preservation of Art

The Monuments Men Foundation for the Preservation of Art is an American foundation, which honors the people who served in the Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives program during and after World War II. The Monuments Men Foundation is one of the rec ...

                                               

Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives program

The Monuments, Fine Arts, and Archives program under the Civil Affairs and Military Government Sections of the Allied armies was established in 1943 to help protect cultural property in war areas during and after World War II. The group of approx ...

                                               

Musicians plate

Musicians plate is an ancient plate found in Tabaristan. This plate has been made in 7th century and it is currently in the possession of the British Museum.This golden plate has been designed by silver fabrication. The musician on the far right ...

                                               

Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act

The Native American Graves Protection and Repatriation Act, Pub. L. 101-601, 25 U.S.C. 3001 et seq., 104 Stat. 3048, is a United States federal law enacted on 16 November 1990. The Act requires federal agencies and institutions that receive feder ...

                                               

New Zealand Tomb of the Unknown Warrior

The New Zealand Tomb of the Unknown Warrior is at the National War Memorial in Buckle Street, Wellington. On 6 November 2004, the remains of an unknown New Zealand soldier were exhumed from the CWGC Caterpillar Valley Cemetery, and laid to rest i ...

                                               

Obelisk of Axum

The Obelisk of Axum is a 4th-century CE, 24-metre-tall phonolite stele/obelisk, weighing 160 tonnes, in the city of Axum in Ethiopia. It is ornamented with two false doors at the base and features decorations resembling windows on all sides. The ...

                                               

Operation Crucible

Operation Crucible is a police-led, multi-agency investigation into the organised theft and unlawful trade of metal in England and Wales. Involved agencies include British Transport Police, the Metropolitan Police Service, Hertfordshire Constabul ...

                                               

Operation Icarus

Operation Icarus is a police investigation into the organised theft and black market trade of religious and church artefacts in England and Wales. The investigation, led by West Mercia Police, commenced in 2013 and has subsequently been declared ...

                                               

Palermo Fragment

The Palermo fragment is a 2.500-year-old marble sculpture fragment of the foot and dress of the ancient Greek goddess Artemis. The Palermo fragment was taken by Lord Elgin from the Parthenon in the early 19th century and given to the British Cons ...

                                               

Pietroasele Treasure

The Pietroasele Treasure found in Pietroasele, Buzau, Romania, in 1837, is a late fourth-century Gothic treasure that included some twenty-two objects of gold, among the most famous examples of the polychrome style of Migration Period art. Of the ...

                                               

Piraeus Lion

The Piraeus Lion ; is one of four lion statues on display at the Venetian Arsenal, where it was displayed as a symbol of Venices patron saint, Saint Mark.

                                               

Polish Crown Jewels

The only surviving original piece of the Polish Crown Jewels from the time of the Piast dynasty is the ceremonial sword – Szczerbiec. It is currently on display along with other preserved royal items at the Wawel Royal Castle Museum in Krakow. Se ...

                                               

Quedlinburg

Quedlinburg is a town situated just north of the Harz mountains, in the district of Harz in the west of Saxony-Anhalt, Germany. In 1994, the castle, church and old town were added to the UNESCO World Heritage List. Quedlinburg has a population of ...

                                               

Ramesses I

Menpehtyre Ramesses I was the founding pharaoh of ancient Egypts 19th dynasty. The dates for his short reign are not completely known but the time-line of late 1292–1290 BC is frequently cited as well as 1295–1294 BC. While Ramesses I was the fou ...

                                               

Relocation of moai objects

Since the removal of the first moai Hoa Hakananaia from Easter Island in 1868 by the crew of HMS Topaze, 79 complete moai, heads, torsos, pukao, and moai figurines are also known to have been removed from their original sites, and transferred to ...

                                               

Removal of the Stone of Scone in 1950

On Christmas Day 1950, four Scottish students from the University of Glasgow removed the Stone of Scone from Westminster Abbey in London and took the Stone back to Scotland. The students were members of the Scottish Covenant Association, a group ...

                                               

Repatriation

Repatriation is the process of returning an asset, an item of symbolic value or a person – voluntarily or forcibly – to its owner or their place of origin or citizenship. The term may refer to non-human entities, such as converting a foreign curr ...

                                               

Repatriation (cultural heritage)

Repatriation is the return of art or cultural heritage, often referring to ancient or looted art, to their country of origin or former owners. The disputed cultural property items are physical artifacts of a group or society that were taken from ...

                                               

Repatriation of Juan Manuel de Rosas's body

Juan Manuel de Rosas was Governor of Buenos Aires Province during the Argentine Civil Wars. Deposed during the battle of Caseros, he spent his later life in exile in Southampton, England, where he died on March 14, 1877. He was buried at the Sout ...

                                               

Returned Treasures Program

The Returned Treasures Program of the INAH Directorate of Global Patrimony or Direccion de Patrimonio Mundial operates under the Government of Mexico’s INAH, the National Institute of Anthropology and History and INAH’s National Museum of Anthrop ...

                                               

Royal Casket

The Royal Casket was a memorial created in 1800 by Izabela Czartoryska. The large wooden casket contained 73 precious relics that had once belonged to Polish royalty. The casket was inscribed: "Polish mementos assembled in 1800 by Izabela Czartor ...

                                               

Seuso Treasure

The Seuso Treasure or Sevso Treasure, is a hoard of silver objects from the late Roman Empire. The first pieces appeared on the market in London in 1980, and the treasure was acquired by a consortium headed by Spencer Compton, 7th Marquess of Nor ...

                                               

Spoliation Advisory Panel

The Spoliation Advisory Panel advises the United Kingdom Government on claims for cultural property looted during the Nazi era. The Panel is designated by the Secretary of State under Section 3 of the Holocaust Return of Cultural Objects Act 2009 ...

                                               

Stone of Scone

The Stone of Scone - also known as the Stone of Destiny, and often referred to in England as The Coronation Stone - is an oblong block of red sandstone that has been used for centuries in the coronation of the monarchs of Scotland, and later also ...

                                               

Treasure of Nagyszentmiklos

The Treasure of Nagyszentmiklos is an important hoard of 23 early medieval gold vessels, in total weighing 9.945 kg, found in 1799 near Nagyszentmiklos, Kingdom of Hungary, meaning "Great St Nicholas". After the excavation, the treasure was trans ...

                                               

Treaty of Tolentino

The Treaty of Tolentino was a peace treaty between Revolutionary France and the Papal States, signed on 19 February 1797 and imposing terms of surrender on the Papal side. The signatories for France were the French Directorys Ambassador to the Ho ...

                                               

Tribunals, Courts and Enforcement Act 2007

The Tribunals, Courts and Enforcement Act 2007 is an Act of the Parliament of the United Kingdom. It provides for several diverse matters relating to the law, some of them being significant changes to the structure of the courts and fundamental l ...

                                               

Trudeau Landing

The Trudeau Landing Site, also known as Tunica Village and Trudeau, is an archaeological site in Tunica, unincorporated West Feliciana Parish, Louisiana, United States. It was once occupied by the Tunica tribe. Later it was developed by Europeans ...

                                               

Marion True

Marion True was the former curator of antiquities for the J. Paul Getty Museum in Los Angeles, California. True was indicted on April 1, 2005, by the Italian court, on criminal charges accusing her of participating in a conspiracy that laundered ...

                                               

Tuqan Man

The skull and bones of a man buried between 9.800 and 10.200 years ago on San Miguel Island, in Californias Channel Islands, were exposed by beach erosion and discovered and preserved in 2005 by University of Oregon archaeologists. The remains we ...

                                               

Westmorland (ship)

The Westmorland or Westmoreland was a 26-gun British privateer frigate, operating in the Mediterranean Sea against French shipping in retaliation for Frances opposition to Great Britain in the American Revolutionary War.

                                               

Yagan

Yagan was an Indigenous Australian warrior from the Noongar people. He played a key part in early resistance to British colonial settlement and rule in the area surrounding what is now Perth, Western Australia. Yagan was pursued by the local auth ...

                                               

Zaluski Library

The Zaluski Library was built in Warsaw in 1747–1795 by Jozef Andrzej Zaluski and his brother, Andrzej Stanislaw Zaluski, both Roman Catholic bishops. The library was the first Polish public library, the largest library in Poland, and one of the ...

                                               

Zaydani Library

The Zaydani Library or the Zaydani Collection is a collection of manuscripts originally belonging to Sultan Zaydan Bin Ahmed that were taken by Spanish privateers in Atlantic waters off the coast of Morocco in 1612. The collection is held to this ...

                                               

Byzantine art

Byzantine art comprises the body of Christian Greek artistic products of the Eastern Roman Empire, as well as the nations and states that inherited culturally from the empire. Though the empire itself emerged from the decline of Rome and lasted u ...

                                               

Carolingian art

Carolingian art comes from the Frankish Empire in the period of roughly 120 years from about 780 to 900 - during the reign of Charlemagne and his immediate heirs - popularly known as the Carolingian Renaissance. The art was produced by and for th ...

                                               

Contemporary art

Contemporary art is the art of today, produced in the second half of the 20th century or in the 21st century. Contemporary artists work in a globally influenced, culturally diverse, and technologically advancing world. Their art is a dynamic comb ...

                                               

Early Christian art and architecture

Early Christian art and architecture or Paleochristian art is the art produced by Christians or under Christian patronage from the earliest period of Christianity to, depending on the definition used, sometime between 260 and 525. In practice, id ...

                                               

Etruscan art

Etruscan art was produced by the Etruscan civilization in central Italy between the 10th and 1st centuries BC. From around 750 BC it was heavily influenced by Greek art, which was imported by the Etruscans, but always retained distinct characteri ...

                                               

Illuminare – Centre for the Study of Medieval Art

Illuminare – Centre for the Study of Medieval Art KU Leuven, is a university-led research and documentation centre. It is situated in the University Library in the town of Leuven, Belgium and is accessible to both academics and students. The focu ...

                                               

Medieval art

The medieval art of the Western world covers a vast scope of time and place, over 1000 years of art in Europe, and at times the Middle East and North Africa. It includes major art movements and periods, national and regional art, genres, revivals ...