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Halo (religious iconography)

A halo is a crown of light rays, circle or disk of light that surrounds a person in art. It has been used in the iconography of many religions to indicate holy or sacred figures, and has at various periods also been used in images of rulers or he ...

                                               

Hibutsu

Hibutsu are Japanese Buddhist icons or statues concealed from public view. Hibutsu are generally located within Buddhist temples in shrines called zushi. They are generally unavailable for viewing or worship, although they are brought out for spe ...

                                               

Iconography of Gautama Buddha in Laos and Thailand

The iconography of Gautama Buddha in Laos and Thailand recall specific episodes during his travels and teachings that are familiar to the Buddhists according to an iconography with specific rules. The Buddha is always represented with certain phy ...

                                               

Ivory carved tusk depicting Buddha life stories

Carved elephant tusk depicting Buddha life stories is an intricately carved complete single tusk now exhibited at the Decorative Arts gallery, National Museum, New Delhi, India. This tusk was donated to the Museum. This tusk, which is nearly five ...

                                               

Kanishka casket

The Kanishka casket or Kanishka reliquary, is a Buddhist reliquary made in gilded copper, and dated to the first year of the reign of the Kushan emperor Kanishka, in 127 CE. It is now in the Peshawar Museum in the historic city of Peshawar, Pakistan.

                                               

Kirikane

Kirikane is a Japanese decorative technique used for Buddhist statues and paintings, using gold leaf, silver leaf, platinum leaf cut into lines, diamonds and triangles.

                                               

Kulu Vase

The Kulu Vase is the name of an ancient buddhist bronze goblet found in the foothills of the Himalayas during the mid nineteenth century. The importance of the vase lies in the fact that it is one of the oldest metal objects to be decorated in th ...

                                               

Kurkihar hoard

The Kurkihar hoard represents a rare set of 226 bronzes, mostly Buddhist, dating to between the 9th and 12th centuries CE, which were found in Kurkihar near Gaya in the Indian state of Bihar. The village of Kurkihar is situated about 5 km. north- ...

                                               

Kushan art

Kushan art, the art of the Kushan Empire in northern India, flourished between the 1st and the 4th century CE. It blended the traditions of the Greco-Buddhist art of Gandhara, influenced by Hellenistic artistic canons, and the more Indian art of ...

                                               

Leela attitude

Leela Attitude is an attitude of Buddha in Thai art of which the Buddha is stepping with his right foot and his right hand swinging and the other hand put towards to the front. The attitude is sometimes called the Walking Buddha. The attitude ref ...

                                               

Luang pho phet

The luang pho phet is a type of image of the Buddha found in Thailand. A luang pho phet depicts the Buddha in the Diamond Lotus Position.

                                               

Mahamuni Buddha Temple

The Mahamuni Buddha Temple is a Buddhist temple and major pilgrimage site, located southwest of Mandalay, Myanmar. The Mahamuni Buddha image is deified in this temple, and originally came from Arakan. It is highly venerated in Burma and central t ...

                                               

Maravijaya attitude

Māravijaya Attitude, or Mara Vichai pchanh mea) is an attitude of Buddha in Thai art of which the seated Buddha is putting his hand in the relax posture towards to the ground, loosely holding his knee. The other hand is on his lap. His eyes, some ...

                                               

Mathura art

The Art of Mathura refers to a particular school of Indian art, almost entirely surviving in the form of sculpture, starting in the 2nd century BCE, which centered on the city of Mathura, in central northern India, during a period in which Buddhi ...

                                               

Mathura lion capital

The Mathura lion capital is an Indo-Scythian sandstone capital from Mathura in Northern India, dated to the first decade of the 1st century CE. It was consecrated under the rule of Rajuvula, one of the Northern Satraps of the region of Mathura. T ...

                                               

Meditation attitude

Meditation Attitude samathi, Thai: ปางสมาธิ ; RTGS: pang samathi) or known as meditating Buddha is an attitude of Buddha in Thai, Burmese, Khmer, Lao, and other Buddhist countries art, of which the seated Buddha is putting both of his upturned ha ...

                                               

Mes Aynak

Mes Aynak, also called Mis Ainak or Mis-e-Ainak, is a site 40 km southeast of Kabul, Afghanistan, located in a barren region of Logar Province. Mes Aynak contains Afghanistans largest copper deposit, as well as the remains of an ancient settlemen ...

                                               

Mingun Bell

The Mingun Bell is a bell located in Mingun, Sagaing Region, Myanmar. It is located approximately 11 km north of Mandalay on the western bank of the Irrawaddy River. It was the heaviest functioning bell in the world at several times in history.

                                               

Naga Prok attitude

Naga Prok attitude prok neak, Thai: ปางนาคปรก ; RTGS: pang nak prok), translated as Sheltered-by-the-Naga Buddha, is an attitude of Buddha in Khmer, Lao and Thai art of which the seated Buddha in either the meditation attitude, or Maravijaya atti ...

                                               

Nanzo-in

Nanzo-in is a Shingon sect Buddhist temple in Sasaguri, Fukuoka Prefecture, Japan. It is notable for its bronze statue of a reclining Buddha, said to be the largest bronze statue in the world.

                                               

Paradise of Maitreya

Artist Zhu Haogu created the Paradise of Maitreya wall painting during Chinas Yuan Dynasty. The painting was originally housed in the Xinghua Si Temple of Xiaoning, Shanxi. During the 1920s and 1930s, it was disassembled and moved to the Royal On ...

                                               

Paubha

Paubhā is a traditional religious painting made by the Newar people of Nepal. Paubhas depict deities, mandalas or monuments, and are used to help the practitioner meditate. The Tibetan equivalent is known as Thangka. Most paubhas show Buddhist su ...

                                               

Prajnaparamita of Java

Prajñāpāramitā of Java refer to a famous depiction of Boddhisattvadevi Prajñāpāramitā, originated from 13th century Singhasari, East Java, Indonesia. The statue is of great aesthetical and historical value, and is considered as the masterpiece of ...

                                               

Promise of Paradise: Early Chinese Buddhist Sculpture

Promise of Paradise: Early Chinese Buddhist Sculpture is a rotating exhibition at the Freer Gallery of Art, the Smithsonians museum of Asian art. The exhibition opened in December 2012, showcasing Chinese Buddhist Art influenced by Buddhism. Budd ...

                                               

Sambas Treasure

The Sambas Treasure is a hoard of ancient gold and silver buddhist sculptures found near the town of Sambas in west Borneo that now form part of the British Museums collection. Dating from 8th-9th centuries AD, they pre-date the coming of Islam t ...

                                               

Sanchi

Sanchi Stupa is a Buddhist complex, famous for its Great Stupa, on a hilltop at Sanchi Town in Raisen District of the State of Madhya Pradesh, India. It is located in 46 kilometres north-east of Bhopal, capital of Madhya Pradesh. The Great Stupa ...

                                               

Sanchi Stupa No. 2

The Stupa No. 2 at Sanchi, also called Sanchi II, is one of the oldest existing Buddhist stupas in India, and part of the Buddhist complex of Sanchi in Madhya Pradesh. It is of particular interest since it has the earliest known important display ...

                                               

Sanchi Yakshi Figure

The Sanchi Yakshi Figure is a sandstone statue of the Shalabhanjika Yakshi from the ancient Buddhist site of Sanchi in the state of Madhya Pradesh, India. One of the earliest Buddhist sculptures from the Indian subcontinent, it has been part of t ...

                                               

Sikri stupa

The Sikri stupa is a work of Buddhist art dated to 3rd-4th century from the Kushan period in Gandahara, consisting of 13 narrative panels that tell the story of Buddha. Modern restoration accounts for their order in the Lahore Museum. The restora ...

                                               

Sirpur Group of Monuments

Sirpur Group of Monuments are an archaeological and tourism site containing Hindu and Buddhist monuments from the 5th to 12th centuries in Mahasamund district of the state of Chhattisgarh, India. Located near an eponymous village, it is 78 kilome ...

                                               

Sonari Stupas

Sonari is the archaeological site of an ancient monastic complex of Buddhist stupas. The site, positioned on a hill, is located about 10 km southwest of Sanchi, Madhya Pradesh, India.

                                               

Bunleua Sulilat

Bunleua Sulilat.rīː.rat" ; numerous variants of the spelling exist in Western languages: see below) was a Thai/Isan/Lao mystic, myth-maker, spiritual cult leader and sculpture artist. He is responsible for creating two religious-themed parks feat ...

                                               

Sultanganj Buddha

The Sultanganj Buddha is a Gupta-Pala transitional period sculpture, the largest substantially complete copper Buddha figure known from the time. The statue is dated to between 500 and 700 AD. It is 2.3 m high and 1 m wide and weighs over 500 kg. ...

                                               

Sutra mound

A sutra mound is an archaeological site where sūtras were buried underground. In Japanese Buddhism, it is a type of good deed, and was done as a type of puja.

                                               

Tagundaing

Tagundaing refers to an ornamented victory column or flagstaff, typically 60 to 80 feet, found within the grounds of Burmese Buddhist pagodas and kyaungs. These ornamented columns were raised within religious compounds to celebrate the submission ...

                                               

Taima mandala

The Taima Mandala is a mandala in Japanese Pure Land Buddhism. The original copy of the mandala is still housed in the Taima-dera temple in Nara, Japan, and was woven c. 763. The mandala is appointed as a national treasure of Japan on April 27, 1 ...

                                               

Takht-e Rostam

Takht-e Rostam or Stupa of Takht-e Rostam is a stupa-monastery complex 2 km south of the town of Haibak. Built in the 4-5th century AD while the area was part of the Kushano-Sasanian Kingdom the complex is carved entirely from the bedrock and "co ...

                                               

Tenjukoku Shūchō Mandala

The Tenjukoku Shūchō Mandala is a Japanese work of textile art. It is the oldest known example of embroidery in Japan, dating back to 622 CE. It was created in honour of Prince Shōtoku, one of the earliest proponents of Japanese Buddhism.

                                               

Tharrawaddy Min Bell

The Tharrawaddy Min Bell, also known as the Maha Tissada Gandha Bell, is a large bell located at the Shwedagon Pagoda in Yangon, Myanmar. It was donated in 1841 by King Tharrawaddy, of Konbaung Dynasty. The official Pali name of the bell is Maha ...

                                               

U Thong Style

The U Thong Style is one of the definitive styles for Buddha icons which developed in Thailand in the southern capital of Ayutthaya. There are three distinct periods for the style, 12th to 13th century, 13th to 14th century and 13th to the 15th c ...

                                               

Urna

In Buddhist art and culture, the Urna, and known as byakugō in Japan) is a spiral or circular dot placed on the forehead of Buddhist images as an auspicious mark. It symbolizes a third eye, which in turn symbolizes vision into the divine world; a ...

                                               

Wardak Vase

The Wardak Vase is the name of an ancient globular-shaped buddhist copper vase that was found as part of a stupa relic deposit in the early nineteenth century near Chaki Wardak in Wardak Province, Afghanistan. The importance of the vase lies in t ...

                                               

Washing the Elephant

Washing the Elephant is a Yuan or Song Dynasty ink on silk hanging scroll attributed to Li Gonglin. The painting depicts the common scene of Manjushri cleaning the elephant. The painting depicts 8 foreign grooms, 2 foreign observers, four monks, ...

                                               

Yantra tattooing

Sak Yant tattooing which influenced much of its culture in the region during its reign. It consists of sacred geometrical, animal and deity designs accompanied by Pali phrases that offer power, protection, fortune, charisma and other benefits for ...

                                               

History of Canadian animation

The history of Canadian animation involves a considerable element of the realities of a country neighbouring the United States and both competitiveness and co-operation cross-border.

                                               

Art of Newfoundland and Labrador

The art of Newfoundland and Labrador has followed a unique artistic trajectory when compared to mainland Canada, due to the geographic seclusion and socio-economic history of the province. Labradorian art possesses its own historical lineage. Whi ...

                                               

Les Automatistes

Les Automatistes were a group of Quebecois artistic dissidents from Montreal, Quebec, Canada. The movement was founded in the early 1940s by painter Paul-Emile Borduas. Les Automatistes were so called because they were influenced by Surrealism an ...

                                               

Beaver Hall Group

The Beaver Hall Group refers to a Montreal-based group of Canadian painters who met in the late 1910s while studying art at a school run by the Art Association of Montreal. The Group is notable for its equal inclusion of men and women artists, as ...

                                               

Group of Seven (artists)

The Group of Seven, also sometimes known as the Algonquin School, was a group of Canadian landscape painters from 1920 to 1933, originally consisting of Franklin Carmichael, Lawren Harris, A. Y. Jackson, Frank Johnston, Arthur Lismer, J. E. H. Ma ...

                                               

Jewish Painters of Montreal

Jewish Painters of Montreal refers to a group of artists who depicted the social realism of Montreal during the 1930s and 1940s. First used by the media to describe participants of the annual YMHA-YWHA art exhibition, the term was popularized in ...