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Glassblowing

Glassblowing is a glassforming technique that involves inflating molten glass into a bubble with the aid of a blowpipe. A person who blows glass is called a glassblower, glassmith, or gaffer. A lampworker manipulates glass with the use of a torch ...

                                               

Glasswort

The glassworts are various succulent, annual halophytes plants, that is, plants that thrive in saline environments, such as seacoasts and salt marshes. The original English glasswort plants belong to the genus Salicornia, but today the glassworts ...

                                               

Thomas Glazier

Thomas Glazier of Oxford was a master glazier active in England during the late 14th and early 15th century; he is one of the earliest identifiable stained glass artists, and is considered a leading proponent of the International Gothic style.

                                               

Harry Clarke – Darkness in Light

Filmmaker John J Doherty traces the life and work of the Irish artist, book illustrator and stained glass artist Harry Clarke 1889–1931 with major contributions from his biographer Nicola Gordon Bowe as well as many stained glass artists, poets a ...

                                               

Hebron glass

Hebron Glass refers to glass produced in Hebron as part of a flourishing art industry established in the city during Roman rule in Palestine. The Old City of Hebron still contains a quarter named the "Glass-Blower Quarter" and Hebron glass contin ...

                                               

Hedwig glass

Hedwig glasses or Hedwig beakers are a type of glass beaker originating in the Middle East or Norman Sicily and dating from the 10th-12th centuries AD. They are named after the Silesian princess Saint Hedwig, to whom three of them are traditional ...

                                               

Hellenistic glass

Hellenistic glass was glass produced during the Hellenistic period, from the conquests of Alexander the Great to the expansion of the Roman Empire in the Mediterranean, Europe, western Asia and northern Africa. Glassmaking at this time was based ...

                                               

History of glass in sub-Saharan Africa

Due to various differences in cultural histories and environmental resources, West African nations developed glass traditions distinct from Egypt, North Africa and the rest of the world. The presence of glass in Sub-Saharan Africa mostly consists ...

                                               

History of optics

Optics began with the development of lenses by the ancient Egyptians and Mesopotamians, followed by theories on light and vision developed by ancient Greek philosophers, and the development of geometrical optics in the Greco-Roman world. The word ...

                                               

Hostmaster

The Hostmaster Pattern was manufactured by New Martinsville Glass Company during the 1930s. Though the line was extensive, New Martinsville Hostmaster Pattern is one of the lesser known patterns of Elegant Glass. There are no reproductions as the ...

                                               

Houghton family

Their family includes: Mundy Hepburn b. 1955, sculptor Edith Houghton Hooker 1879–1948, suffragist Arthur A. Houghton Sr. 1866–1928, son of Amory Houghton Jr, former president of Corning Glass, married Mahitbel Hollister 1867–1938 Amory Houghton ...

                                               

Charles Eamer Kempe

Charles Eamer Kempe was a Victorian designer and manufacturer of stained glass. His studios produced over 4.000 windows and also designs for altars and altar frontals, furniture and furnishings, lichgates and memorials that helped to define a lat ...

                                               

Luck of Edenhall

The "Luck of Edenhall" is a glass beaker that was made in Syria or Egypt in the middle of the 14th century, elegantly decorated with arabesques in blue, green, red and white enamel with gilding. It is now in the Victoria and Albert Museum in Lond ...

                                               

Ball jar

A Mason jar, named after John Landis Mason who first invented and patented it in 1858, is a molded glass jar used in home canning to preserve food. The jars mouth has a screw thread on its outer perimeter to accept a metal ring. The band, when sc ...

                                               

Medieval stained glass

Medieval stained glass is the coloured and painted glass of medieval Europe from the 10th century to the 16th century. For much of this period stained glass windows were the major pictorial art form, particularly in northern France, Germany and E ...

                                               

Morris & Co.

Morris, Marshall, Faulkner & Co. was a furnishings and decorative arts manufacturer and retailer founded by the artist and designer William Morris with friends from the Pre-Raphaelites. With its successor Morris & Co. the firms medieval-inspired ...

                                               

Jane Morris

Jane Morris was an English embroiderer in the Arts & Crafts Movement and artists model who embodied the Pre-Raphaelite ideal of beauty. She was a model and muse to her husband William Morris and to Dante Gabriel Rossetti. Her sister was the embro ...

                                               

Hermann von Munster

Hermman von Munster is actually the first stained glass artist to be mentioned by the archives of the Cathedral chapter of Saint-Etienne of Metz. On August 29, 1381, master Hermann received an annuity of 22 pounds, to pay for its work on the west ...

                                               

Venetian glass

Venetian glass is thought to have been made for over 1.500 years, and production has been concentrated on the Venetian island of Murano since the 13th century. Today Murano is known for its art glass, but it has a long history of innovations in g ...

                                               

National Glass Workers' Trade Protection Association

The National Glass Workers Trade Protection Association was a trade union in the United Kingdom. It merged with the Transport and General Workers Union in 1940.

                                               

Michael Joseph Owens

He was born in Mason County, West Virginia on January 1, 1859. He left school at the age of 10 to start a glassware apprenticeship at J. H. Hobbs, Brockunier and Company in Wheeling, West Virginia. In 1888 he moved to Toledo, Ohio and worked for ...

                                               

Pauly & C. – Compagnia Venezia Murano

Pauly & C. – Compagnia Venezia Murano is a Venetian company that produces glass art, most notably Roman murrine, mosaics and chandeliers. The company was formed in 1919 by a merger of Pauly & C founded 1902 and the Compagnia di Venezia e Murano f ...

                                               

Apsley Pellatt

Apsley Pellatt was an English glassware manufacturer and politician. He was the son of glassware maker Apsley Pellatt 1763–1826 and Mary nee Maberly Pellatt.

                                               

Planetarium Jena

The Zeiss-Planetarium in Jena, Germany is the oldest continuously operating planetarium in the world. It was opened on July 18, 1926. The Zeiss-Planetarium is a projection planetarium. The planets and fixed stars are projected onto the inner surf ...

                                               

Potash works

A potash works was a subsidiary operation of a glassworks in the Early Modern Period. The latter needed potash, as well as quartz and lime as raw materials for the manufacture of glass. Potash acted as a flux in the production process, that is by ...

                                               

Andrew Pritchard

Andrew Pritchard FRSE was an English naturalist and natural history dealer who made significant improvements to microscopy and studied microscopic organisms. His belief that God and nature were one led him to the Unitarians, a religious movement ...

                                               

Purpurin (glass)

Purpurin, sometimes referred to as glass porphyr, is an opaque glass of brownish to lustrous deep-reddish color which in classical antiquity was used for residential luxury objects, mosaics and various decorative purposes. Purpurin is somewhat ha ...

                                               

Rayonnant

In French Gothic architecture, Rayonnant was the period between c. 1240 and 1350, characterized by a shift in focus away from the High Gothic mode of utilizing great scale and spatial rationalism towards a greater concern for two dimensional surf ...

                                               

Reduction of Hours of Work (Glass-Bottle Works) Convention, 1935 (shelved)

Reduction of Hours of Work Convention, 1935 is an International Labour Organization Convention. It was established in 1935, with the preamble stating: Considering that the question of the reduction of hours of work is the sixth item on the agenda ...

                                               

Rhinestone

A rhinestone, paste or diamante is a diamond simulant originally made from rock crystal but since the 19th century from crystal glass or polymers such as acrylic.

                                               

Rolled plate glass

Rolled plate is a type of industrially produced glass. It was invented and patented by James Hartley circa 1847. Rolled plate is used architecturally; for example, in the mid-19th century uses for rolled plate glass included roofing railway stati ...

                                               

Roman glass

Roman glass objects have been recovered across the Roman Empire in domestic, industrial and funerary contexts. Glass was used primarily for the production of vessels, although mosaic tiles and window glass were also produced. Roman glass producti ...

                                               

Rona glassworks

RONA a.s. is a Slovak drinking glass manufacturer, established in Lednicke Rovne, Slovakia, in 1892. The name RONA comes from the former naming of the village Lednicz Rone’’. The company manufactures unleaded drinking glasses, known as crystal gl ...

                                               

Saint-Gobain

Compagnie de Saint-Gobain S.A. is a French multinational corporation, founded in 1665 in Paris and headquartered on the outskirts of Paris, at La Defense and in Courbevoie. Originally a mirror manufacturer, it now also produces a variety of const ...

                                               

Saint-Louis (glass manufacturer)

The Compagnie des Cristalleries de Saint Louis is a corporation, founded in 1767 in Munzthal in Lorraine. It is the oldest glass manufacturer in France with roots dating back to 1586 and the first crystal glass manufacturer in continental Europe. ...

                                               

Sasanian glass

Sasanian Glass is the glassware produced between the 3rd and the 7th centuries AD within the limits of the Sasanian Empire of Persia, namely present-day Northern Iraq, Iran and Central Asia. This is a silica-soda-lime glass production characteriz ...

                                               

Otto Schott

Friedrich Otto Schott was a German chemist, glass technologist, and the inventor of borosilicate glass. He was the son of a window glass maker, Simon Schott. From 1870 to 1873 Schott studied chemical technology at the technical college in Aachen ...

                                               

Sheet-Glass Works Convention, 1934 (shelved)

Sheet-Glass Works Convention, 1934 is an International Labour Organization Convention established in 1934, with a preamble stating: Having decided upon the adoption of certain proposals with regard to the regulation of hours of work in automatic ...

                                               

Stained glass

The term stained glass can refer to coloured glass as a material or to works created from it. Throughout its thousand-year history, the term has been applied almost exclusively to the windows of churches and other significant religious buildings. ...

                                               

Autonomous Stained Glass

The term "autonomous" as applied to stained glass refers to works which are designed independent of architecture. Autonomous works are not designed to glaze windows. The term "stained glass" commonly precedes "window" and is thus linked to archit ...

                                               

Georg Friedrich Strass

Georg Friedrich Strass was an Alsatian jeweler and inventor of imitation gemstones. He is best known as the inventor of the rhinestone, called strass in many European languages, from a particular type of crystal he found in the river Rhine. He us ...

                                               

John Thornton (glass painter)

John Thornton of Coventry was a master glazier and stained glass artist active in England during the 15th century. The output of his workshop includes some of the finest English medieval glass.

                                               

Tin-glazed pottery

Tin-glazed pottery is earthenware covered in lead glaze with added tin oxide which is white, shiny and opaque ; usually this provides a background for brightly painted decoration. It has been important in Islamic and European pottery, but very li ...

                                               

Tin-glazing

Tin-glazing is the process of giving ceramic items a glaze that is white, glossy and opaque, which is normally applied to red or buff earthenware. Tin-glaze is plain lead glaze with a small amount of tin oxide added. The opacity and whiteness of ...

                                               

Turner Museum of Glass

The Turner Museum of Glass is housed in the Department of Materials Science and Engineering at the University of Sheffield, in England. It is in the Hadfield Building with the entrance from Portobello Street. It contains examples from ancient Egy ...

                                               

Verreville Glass and Pottery Works, Glasgow

Verreville Glassworks was established on the north bank of the River Clyde in the village of Finnieston in 1777. Glass making was discontinued in 1842. The buildings of the works, including the 120 feet high glasshouse cone, were converted into a ...

                                               

Vitrified fort

Vitrified forts are stone enclosures whose walls have been subjected to vitrification through heat. It was long thought that these structures were unique to Scotland, but they have since been identified in several other parts of western and north ...

                                               

William Warrington

William Warrington, was an English maker of stained glass windows. His firm, operating from 1832 to 1875, was one of the earliest of the English Medieval revival and served clients such as Norwich and Peterborough Cathedrals. Warrington was an hi ...

                                               

Wistarburg Glass Works

The Wistarburg Glass Works was the first successful glass factory and joint-venture enterprise in the Thirteen Colonies. Caspar Wistar founded the glass works company in 1739. He began by recruiting experienced glass artisans from Europe, and bui ...

                                               

Women in the art history field

Women were professionally active in the academic discipline of art history already in the nineteenth century and participated in the important shift early in the century that began involving an "emphatically corporeal visual subject", with Vernon ...